Why is the proxy server refusing connections?

Troubleshooting Directory Proxy Server for Refused Connections
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With the use of the following diagram, this section describes how operations are processed within the server and which resources are being involved in such processing. The resource usage can be dumped to the error log file by sending a USR2 signal to Directory Proxy Server process.

The Clientlistener detects any new incoming connections from the clients and stores them in a buffer of pending connections. From time to time, the ConnectionHandler fetches all the pending connection and put them in the list of connections to process (a Java Selector). The following resource dump excerpt shows some figures around incoming connections:

0.0.0.0:2389 useSSL:false Thread[Connection Handler 0 for Listener Thread 0.0.0.0:2389, 5, main] ConnectionHandler pending connections = 0 ConnectionHandler pending connections 2 = 0 ConnectionHandler connections in selector = 1 Thread[Connection Handler 1 for Listener Thread 0.0.0.0:2389, 5, main] ConnectionHandler pending connections = 0 ConnectionHandler pending connections 2 = 0 ConnectionHandler connections in selector = 0

By default, Directory Proxy Server has two client listeners, one for normal connection and one for secure connection, and each client listener has two connection handlers.

The ConnectionHandler reads bytes in the file descriptor and puts them in the WorkQueue after getting a full LDAP operation. The operations in the queue are retrieved by the WorkerThreads for processing. At any time, the WorkQueue keeps the following information available to the resource dumper:

WorkQueue Norm inQ = 0 number of operations in the Q WorkQueue Norm peak = 1 the peak of operations in the Q WorkQueue Norm totalIn = 1875 the total # of operations put by the connection handlers WorkQueue Norm totalOut = 1875 the total # of operations get by the workers WorkQueue High inQ = 0 - same but foe the "high priority" Q WorkQueue High peak = 0 - same but foe the "high priority" Q WorkQueue High totalIn = 0 - same but foe the "high priority" Q WorkQueue High totalOut = 0 - same but foe the "high priority" Q WorkQueue abandonRequests = 0 the number of abandon requests WorkQueue abandonSuccess = 0 the number of succeeded abandons

When the WorkQueue is empty, the WorkerThreads are idle. As soon as a WorkerThread has got an operation from the WorkQueue it becomes busy. The resource dumper provides the state of the WorkerThreads:

WorkerThread: idle = 49 -> all the WorkerThreads are idle but 1 WorkerThread: busy = 1

In the first step of processing, the WorkerThread gets a list of data views where the operation can be routed to. This step is not described here. Then each elected data view goes through a data source pool to get an LDAP server. The choice of the LDAP server is done by the Load Balancing algorithm. For example, if the Proportional load balancing was in use then the statistics would look like the following:

Data Source Pool pool1 pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Bind (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Add (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Search (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Compare (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Delete (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - Modify (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - total connections - ModifyDN (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Bind pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Add pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Search pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Compare pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Delete pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for Modify pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0) pool1 - ProportionalLB - Connections per server for ModifyDN pool1 - ProportionalLB - ds1 (provided=0 refused=0)

The chosen LDAP server is requested to provide a connection to the remote backend. The connections to remote backends are managed through a two pools of connections (ConnectionPool). One pool for the normal connections and another for the secure connections, for example. If Directory Proxy Server is configured to have only secured connections to remote backends then the second pool is not used and the first pool contains the secured connections. Each pool contains connections dedicated to BIND operations, READ operations, and WRITE operations. For each of these sets, the resource dumper reports the current number of connections in the pool and the number of the connections available. The number of connections can be increased when needed but cannot exceed the maximum number of connections, that is, 1024 by default.

BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool1-DS1] BIND (max=1024 cur=10 avail=10) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool1-DS1] READ (max=1024 cur=10 avail=10) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool1-DS1] WRITE (max=1024 cur=10 avail=10) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool1-DS1] Bound connections = 0 BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool2-DS1] BIND (max=1024 cur=0 avail=0) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool2-DS1] READ (max=1024 cur=0 avail=0) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool2-DS1] WRITE (max=1024 cur=0 avail=0) BackendConnectionPool [woz:8389/:pool2-DS1] Bound connections = 0

The LDAP server keeps some statistics around the usage of the pools.

bindConnectionsRequested = 0 bindConnectionsProvided = 0 bindConnectionsRefused = 0 bindConnectionWaitsRequired = 0 bindConnectionsReturnedValid = 0 bindConnectionsReturnedInvalid = 0 readConnectionsRequested = 0 readConnectionsProvided = 0 readConnectionsRefused = 0 readConnectionWaitsRequired = 0 readConnectionsReturnedValid = 0 readConnectionsReturnedInvalid = 0 writeConnectionsRequested = 0 writeConnectionsProvided = 0 writeConnectionsRefused = 0 writeConnectionWaitsRequired = 0 writeConnectionsReturnedValid = 0 writeConnectionsReturnedInvalid = 0

At any time, we have the requested number of connections as requested = provided + refused. Sometimes, the WorkerThread has to wait a bit for a connection to be available. The WorkerThread after completing its job, returns the connection to the pool. If the connection is no more valid, then the connection is returned as invalid and cannot be reused.

These figures around connections to backend can help in the server resource tuning. For example:

totalReadConnections: 1024 availableReadConnections: 0 readConnectionsRequested: 2121 readConnectionsProvided: 1612 readConnectionsRefused: 509 readConnectionWaitsRequired: 1019 readConnectionsReturnedValid: 1612 readConnectionsReturnedInvalid: 0

After analyzing the data provided, the following is concluded:

  • There are no more connections available in the pool, and the pool has reached its maximum size, that is, 1024 connections.
  • There are 2121 requests and only 1612 connections are provided, which is bad for scalability.
  • The worker threads had to wait 1019 times for a connection to be available, which is bad for performance.
  • Any refused connection will end with a SERVER_ERROR returned to the client.

Source: docs.oracle.com


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